Hope, Joy, Life & Living, Videos

baby buddy: you get peed on, you get puked on, who wouldn’t want to do it?

Mom ADORED babies. This would have been the perfect “activity” to help her feel joyful, give meaning to her life and help others at the same time while she lived in the early and mid “stages” of Alzheimer disease.

When I watched the video, it reminded me of this one in which 10-day-old wyatt met his great-grandmother for the first time for the first time (precious!).

Like combining childcare and eldercare, I think this is wonderful win/win idea that could really work and help give PLWD a sense of meaning and purpose if those things might be missing from their lives.

Your thoughts?

Furthermore, this is the way (with love, compassion, tenderness and humanity) we should treat elders living with dementia in long term care instead of like this.

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Family, Life & Living, Little things count, Love, Videos

10-day-old wyatt meets his great-grandma for the first time

*Trigger warning:* beautiful and moving video below. Tissues recommended.

Care partners by the thousands share their joys, sorrows, challenges and solutions in Facebook groups and FB communities–it’s one way to feel connected and be supported by others sailing in similar boats.  The posts are both heart-wrenching and heartwarming, often making me laugh and cry at the same time. One of Sherri Sturm’s stood out from all the others. I asked her if she would let me “go public” with it; she generously agreed.

Sherri described what took place, and shared some video clips with me:

“My mom Sharon is in the later stages of Alzheimer disease. Still, I wanted her to meet Wyatt, my 10-day-old grandson, and her great-grandson. I wasn’t sure how she would react, since she appears to have lost the ability to communicate with words. It feels like she doesn’t understand what we say to her, and she seems not to know any of us either.

Mom has always loved babies, and I thought she might enjoy holding Wyatt. I put him carefully in her arms; she immediately and naturally cradled him. When he put his hand near her mouth, I was afraid she might bite it, mistaking it for food. Instead, she kissed it gently, and mumbled to him. When I made a motion to take him back, she clearly communicated with her body language that she wanted to hold him a little longer. These were such beautiful, precious moments:

This experience showed me that we will never know what someone living with dementia at this stage really thinks, feels or understands. My advice? Don’t discount your loved one with dementia regardless of how they appear on the outside. They are still very much whom they are deep down inside. Treasure every moment, and include them in special occasions and life celebrations whenever you can. You will never regret it.”

Beautiful and precious indeed.

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Humour, Life & Living, Tips, tools & skills

laughing babies better than any pill ever invented, cure for virtually everything

laughing baby 8

“That’s the best idea yet!” I congratulated my cousin Liane.

“I KNOW!” She answered with a smile I could hear. “Who can resist laughing babies?”

“Not even me,” I LOL-ed.

Fifty-year-old Liane, a former nurse, care partners with her 80-year-old friend Florence who was recently diagnosed with dementia. Liane helped Florence move into an assisted living facility across from a long-term care home where the pair now volunteer for an hour or two each afternoon.

“Florence loves to be active. And she’s very social. So she and I were serving tea – having tea is one of the highlights of the day, you know.”

“I know,” I said. “There’s not much to do in those places. Everyone’s bored to tears.”

“Yeah,” she agreed. “Anyway, I had just given a cup of tea to one particular lady who always seems to be unhappy. She’s kind of grouchy and mean. Never smiles. Always complains.”

I’d probably be unhappy too, I reflected to myself. We need to do a better job of caring for the elderly, especially those with dementia. They deserve better than what they’re getting.

“All of all of a sudden I got this brain wave,” Liane continued. “I fished my iPad out of my bag, got on to YouTube, and found a video of laughing babies. Well. You can’t imagine the reaction of that cranky old lady. Within seconds she was smiling and laughing and pointing at the babies. It was great.”

“That’s BRILLIANT Liane. I wish I’d thought of it.”

“The next day, I put laughing babies on the big screen they have in the common room. All the ladies and even the few men that were there were over the moon. ‘Isn’t she cute?’ One said. ‘Look at that one,’ another said. They were smiling and cooing and oohing and ahhhing. Laughing babies. Best cure ever. Who knew?”

My Alzheimer’s Story prescribes joyful activities to create happiness in the lives of people with dementia.

Rx Laughing Babies

Better than any pill ever invented for immediate relief of boredom, depression, anger, anxiety, aggression, aches, pains, and overall malaise associated with life, aging, dementia, and most everything that might ail you or your loved ones.

Dosage:

Enjoy five minutes of laughing babies anytime day or night; before, after or with meals.

Proven results:

Mood improvement, better attitude, smiles, laughter, joy, happiness, connection, engagement, love.

Notes:

Impossible to overdose. No known negative side effects. No contraindications. Efficient; effective; costs virtually nothing.

Complementary therapies include:

Playful puppies, cats and kittens, jumping kids (too cute for words), and ballet dancing children.

https://myalzheimersstory.com/2018/03/15/turn-potential-dementia-disasters-into-fun-and-laughter/

https://myalzheimersstory.com/2019/05/07/care-partner-humour-milkin-it/

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