who’s in charge, where are they and do they care?

2

“…and #6 is a big one for me along with #8, #9,#14, #17 (invest in staff who have a passion for eldercare and train them) and #20 (is related to #6 – get rid of the old, stuffy, top-down structure and work together to foster creativity and innovation on behalf of the residents in care).

Mom lives in a facility that is one year old. There are few regular activities as activities are funded through donations, which there don’t seem to be enough of.  I’ve noticed a revolving door of casual staff in the past six months. I visit at different times during the day — mostly in the morning, late afternoon or early evening. Not once in almost a year have I ever laid eyes on anybody in administration. I’ve never seen the Director of Care or the Executive Director (both of whom have impressive staff profiles on the facility website), actually talking to the residents. For me, that begs the question: Are they solely paper pushers or do they have compassion, care and concern for the residents? If it’s the latter why aren’t they ever visible to the residents’ family members when they go to visit at a variety of different times of the day? In my opinion, leaders need to be visible and interact with the residents from time to time…”

When members of leadership and administration teams take time to go out “on the floor,” it gives them an opportunity to observe how care is delivered. I suspect many would be surprised by what they would either see, or not, as the case may be.
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2 Comments

  1. In the facility that I lived in the admins came out on the floor but it was purely cosmetics. They would talk with family but hardly even glance at the patients. It is all about money. There are always good workers but they get so little pay and way too much responsibility that they go on or they change for the worse. 🙁 I am so sorry about your mothers. The dementia patients are the most vulnerable and it is shameful.

    • M. Susan Macaulay on

      You speak the truth WritersDream, and it really is a shame. The plus side is there’s lots of room for improvement, and that’s why I keep advocating. Thanks so much for your empathy and understanding.

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